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Year XXII, No. 9 (September 2018)

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WELCOME MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Kristian:Desktop:Kristian Alexander portrait.jpgWelcome to the International Music Academy 2016-2017 school year! Our Faculty and Staff are very excited and proud to having you as a student! We look forward to working with you and fostering your potential through music. Our expert teachers will take care of all aspects of your program at the International Music Academy. We wish you an exciting and stimulating school year!

Kristian Alexander
M.Mus., M.A., MBA, D.E.S.S.G.O.C., B.Mus., B.A.
Director



WELCOMING OUR NEW STUDENTS

Ahana N. (piano)
Christina Z. (piano)
Kevin G. (piano)
Pina L. (piano)
Amol D. (piano)
Caitlyn B. (piano)
Teagan A. (violin)
James M (piano)
Xavier M. (piano)
Elliot T. (guitar)
Akilini J. (piano)

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UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

Emily B., Claudia I., Savannah G., Beatrice Y., Isabelle D., Jenelle Y., Thea D., Emma F., Edwin D., Arianna L., Jenny W., Mya T.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

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IMPORTANT DAYS IN SEPTEMBER

September 1. School year begins.
September 3. Labour Day. School is open.
September 9-11. Rosh Hashanah. School is open.
September 18-19. Yom Kippur. School is open.
September 24. PA day (YR). School is open.

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NEWS

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The Royal Conservatory of Music June session examination results have been announced. Congratulations to the IMA students achieving considerably higher than the Provincial average marks, with distinction.

Student

Subject, grade

Mark

Teacher

Emily Jong

Level 7 Theory

94

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Arianna Lagunzad

Preparatory B Piano

93

Ms. Suzanne Marfise

Thivya Jeyapalan

Level 7 Theory

92

Ms. Antonia De Wolfe

Jonathan Wong

Level 7 Theory

92

Ms. Suzanne Marfise

Avni Prabhu

Preparatory A Piano

89

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Priyanka Ragunathan

Level 5 Theory

88

Ms. Antonia De Wolfe

Savannah Dunberry

Level 7 Theory

88

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Shaelin Baldsing

Level 2 Piano

86

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Jason Chen

Level 7 Piano

85

Ms. Antonia De Wolfe

Jeffrey Su

Level 4 Clarinet

84

Mr. Leonid Sprikut

Nitin Raj

Level 2 Piano

83

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Jerry Wong

Level 2 Piano

83

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Jatynne Raj

Level 4 Piano

83

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Rohin Furchner

Preparatory B Piano

80

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Garrett Kawabata

Level 7 Violin

78

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Alexandra Lavric

Level 1 Piano

77

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Trevor Tseng

Level 5 Piano

77

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Reese Bi

Level 4 Piano

77

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Carter Kawabata

Level 6 Violin

77

Ms. Lili Imastounian

Steven Li

Level 4 Piano

75

Ms. Antonia De Wolfe

Rex Hakimi

Level 1 Piano

73

Ms. Marina Grigoryan

Janice Chung

Level 4 Piano

70

Ms. Lili Imastounian

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GET 3 FREE LESSONS WITH THE PURCHASE OF A PIANO

If you are ready to purchase a high quality pre-own piano through one of the IMA commercial partners, 3 of your lessons at the IMA will be free. Call our Office or e-mail Office@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca for more information. Pre-own piano is a great investment that comes at an attractive price, with a free tuning and delivery.

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GET A $30 CREDIT ON YOUR NEXT MONTH TUITION

We have been very pleased with the continuous success of our students. They have improved a great deal and we share their excitement with their families, friends, neighbors, and schoolmates. We appreciate your interest towards our programs and services. We are always very happy to welcome new students of all ages, levels, and instruments to the iMA. Please tell your friends about your experience with the International Music Academy.

Do you know someone who is thinking of taking music lessons or who has children who may be interested in getting their hands on a musical instrument or singing? Do you know a teenager who needs a high school OAC credit? Do you know an adult who has wanted for a long time to learn how to play a musical instrument but has never had the time or inclination? Please tell them about the IMA.

As an appreciation for your referral, we will give you a $30 credit for each new student who registers at the International Music Academy as a result of your referral. As we value your friends as much as we value you, we will offer to each referred student a $30 credit as well.

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FOLLOW US ON

Stay in touch and follow the IMA latest news on Facebook. Visit Facebook and become a friend of the International Music Academy.

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PERSONALIZED IMA GIFT CARD

The IMA offers personalized Gift Cards that could be used as thoughtful birthday, holiday, bar/bat Mitzvah, graduation gift or for any other occasions as well as to encourage someone to start learning a musical instrument or singing. The card can be used for any products or services.

The gift card is available for any amount. As cards are personalized with the name of the person who will receive it as well as with the name of the person who purchase it, requests have to be made 1 day in advance. Cards can be ordered in person, by phone at 905.489.4620 or by e-mail at info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca. At the time the card is ordered, a non-refundable $5 deposit is required. The full value of the card is paid upon pick-up (and the deposit is credited towards the purchase price). Payments can be made by any major credit card, cheque or cash as well as through the accounts of the IMA Clients.

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COMPOSERS’ ANNIVERSARIES IN SEPTEMBER

4/9/1824 - Bruckner born

4/9/1892 - Milhaud born 

4/9/1907- Grieg died

5/9/1735 - J.C. Bach born 

5/9/1912 - John Cage born 

8/9/1841 - Dvorak born

8/9/1949 - Richard Strauss died

13/9/1874 – D. Schoenberg born 

20/9/1957 – J. Sibelius died

21/9/1874 – G. Holst born

23/9/1836 - Bellini died

25/9/1906 - Shostakovich born

25/9/1849 – J. Strauss Sr died 

26/9/1898 - Gershwin born 

26/9/1945 - Bartok died

Where you born or do you know someone who was born on the same day as these famous composers? Drop us e-mail at info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca to let us know.

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FEATURED TEACHER OF THE MONTH

Mr. Werner Chan

Piano Studies and Music Theory

Born in Hong Kong, Werner Chan started to learn piano at the age of 5. At the age of 11, he had his first piano recital in the local church and became the accompanist for the Don Bosco Choir for 7 consecutive years. He secured a place to study music at the Hong Kong Academy for the Performing Arts (HKAPA) and obtained a Diploma of Music in 2001. In September of the same year, Werner received the Conservatory Ovation (Piano) Award and the International Chancellor’s Award, to study music at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, USA. He graduated with distinction with a Master’s degree in Music in 2007. Mr. Chan has over 15 years of piano teaching experience. He started his piano teaching career in 2001 as a private in-campus tutor. Mr. Chan teaches students ranging from very young age to adults and seniors. He adapts his teaching style according to the personal learning style of his students. He is patient, observant and can establish good rapport with his students in no time. Mr. Chan shares his passion for music with others and makes the music lesson a stimulating and joyful experience to those who learn with him. On the other hand, with students of higher grades, Mr. Chan would focus a lot on interpretations of works of various composers, leading to achieving high marks in the RCM examinations and competitions. In tune with his belief in life-long learning, Mr. Chan continues to polish his piano teaching techniques by taking courses of pedagogic nature. Apart from teaching piano and music theory, Werner has been performing piano publicly in Toronto. In the past, he performed in the Open Score Salon Series of University of Toronto; the Opus One home concerts for classical music; the 2015 and 2016 Concerts hosted by the Ontario Cross-Cultural Music Society. In August 2016, Werner was invited to perform as the pianist of the Broadway Rock Musical “Rent”, a two-and-half hour production presented by the Markham Youth Theatre. Mr. Chan is a registered RCM teacher and a member of the Ontario Registered Music Teachers Association (ORMTA). He speaks fluently French, Mandarin and Cantonese.

Mr. Chan was happy to answer a few questions for our students and parents:

1. What do you like most about teaching?
There is a great satisfaction for me to inspire students to discover the meaning of music in their lives.  It is crucial to motivate them to find out what kind of music is the dearest to their hearts.  For me my goal is to build chemistry and connection with the students throughout the semester and help them achieve their musical goals through supply of inspirational repertoire to kindle their motivation to learn. When they have achieved the goals they set out to attain, that is my moment, and all the hard work along the way is all worthwhile. 

2. How do you inspire students to practice more?
As I build rapport with my students, I will begin to understand their particular interests in music and I will incorporate their favourite music that would motivate them to learn, that would keep them engaged in practicing during the week.  With music they are interested in, they will definitely be willing to make practicing piano as part of their daily routine and it will become a pleasure and not a chore. Close communication with their parents is also important so that they know and understand the progress of their children and in turn help them attain their goals.

3. What roles does performance play in student’s development?
Performance is the ultimate goal for all my students.  It is a goal for them to work on throughout the semester and it is a great method to set a standard for themselves to follow.  A performing experience is also a positive reinforcement of what they have learnt, an encouragement for them to continue with music making. It becomes a defining moment for them every single time they step on the stage to perform.  

4. Who are your favourite composers?
A lot of different composers with different genres have influenced throughout my whole life.  For example, I love Beethoven and Mozart with their endless piano repertoire. But If I have to choose between them I would choose Beethoven because his music suits my musical tastes better.  I also love 20th century composers such as Stravinsky, Bernstein, Bartok, Boulez and Ravel.  Asian American composers also have a huge influence on me as I am interested in blending eastern and western music together.  Composers who had a deep impact on me as a musician are Tan Dun, Bright Sheng, Chen Yi and Zhou Long.  

5. What was the last piece of music (sheet music or a recording) you purchased for yourself?

I purchased Beethoven’s complete 32 piano sonatas because I love playing his sonatas everyday.  I also have been researching on Bartók’s music so I also purchased his Compositions for piano, which has Suite, Op. 14 and Romanian Folk dances and other piano pieces.

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FEATURED STUDENT OF THE MONTH

Lucas Alfonso

 

Description: Macintosh HD:Users:Kristian:Desktop:Isabelle Dasgupta.jpgWhat instrument do you play? –  I am learning to play piano with John Mills, but I also want to learn how to play electric guitar.

How long have you taken lessons? – I just started at IMA last year, in 2017. 

Who are your favourite musical artists? – My favourite artist is Michael Jackson. When I'm in the car with my sister and parents we take turns and each choose a song to be played on and I always choose a song by Michael Jackson. 

What are your other hobbies, besides music? –Sports! I love to watch and play any sports. My favourites now are soccer and hockey. I also like to spent time playing with my Beyblades.

Favourite food? – I really love the spaghetti Bolognese my dad makes for me.

What is the coolest thing you’ve learnt in your lessons in the past three months? The coolest thing I have recently learnt is how to play a B-flat :)

Do you have any performance coming up? –No, I don't have any performance coming up.


E-mail to info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca a photo of yourself (or your child) together with the answers of the questions above. The deadline for submissions is the 15th of every month. We will feature you in one of the next issues of the newsletter.

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PET OF THE MONTH

Send a photo of your pet together with following information and we will publish it in one of the next issues of the IMA newsletter. What is the name of your pet? How old is he/she? What kind of breed our pet is (if applicable)? How long have you had him/her for? Any special circumstances around getting the pet (i.e. a gift, foster pet, etc.)? The funniest story about you pet? Any special skills or abilities?

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FEATURED ARTICLE

Is Interest In Classical Music Dying?

By Bria Nicole Stone

Description: https://i2.wp.com/truthbetold.news/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Classical-Music-Story-Photo.jpg?resize=800%2C534

Classical music is one of the oldest forms of music, lasting for over 400 years. In the past classical music was so popular that it was once a core class for many students during the Renaissance Era. Classical music has been a way to indicate class and social status, and many former composers and instrumentalist had fame equivalent to modern day pop stars. Although classical music has survived through years, with changing styles and performances, many argue that interest in classical music and specifically classical music training, has died.

According to the National Endowment for the Arts, classical music performances and attendances have decreased dramatically. In within the last 5 years, attendance to classical music performances has decreased with only 8.8% of Americans attending a classical concert. This is a 2.8% decrease from the early 2000’s, with older Americans being the only group to increase in attendance. This can be caused by the fact that many orchestras have discontinued in recent years, and many musicians state they are not willing to put in the long hours and low pay that can often come with being a professional musician. This can also be caused by the changing concert etiquette and performance styles that changed during the 20th century.

Not only has attendance at classical music concerts decreased, but the amount of students enrolling into classical music programs has also decreased. Dr. Anthony Randolph, the director of music in the fine arts department at Howard University stated that the music department has seen a decrease in the amount of students over the recent years and that they have also seen more students pursuing alternate music disciplines instead of just performance. “There hasn’t been an increase but actually a decrease in enrolment in the music department and especially in performance, but that isn’t because of lack of interest but more so because of lack of scholarships for music majors and parents who are afraid to let their children study music….however, what we have seen, is increases mostly in our music therapy program and music education has seen steady high numbers.” Said Dr. Randolph.

With the increase in music education, and music therapy, the use of music in physical, emotional, cognitive, and social therapy, it is clear that interest in learning music is still relevant. However, it is important to note that many students who receive a degree in music or music education often pursue different studies in graduate school or alternate careers. It is important to discuss the real reasons behind why performances are down, attendances are down, and why many think classical music is dying.

Money, culture, sponsors, and engagement, all contribute to the reason why classical music seems to be less popular today. Classical music has not adjusted to the changing culture in music and concerts. With cheaper tickets and more relaxed venues being available, many music lovers, especially millennials, are not willing to pay the high prices that come along with classical music concerts. While many average pop concert tickets can sell for as low as $30-50, many classical music concerts can average around $200 for a general ticket. Not only does money impact the audience, but it also impacts the musicians and record labels as well. While orchestra musicians for major symphony orchestras make an average of $100,000-$150,000 a year, it takes years of training and performing in order to join a major symphony. Also, with symphonies receiving less sponsors, often due to poor marketing and publicity, their musicians often have to take pay cuts and make less money each year, many will even consider music teaching to earn more money. For example, the Macon Symphony Orchestra will be performed their last concert on October 14 due to lack of sponsors for musicians and funding, and according to the orchestras president, Bob Veto, it can cost around $50,000 per night to stage a concert.

Coleen Ennis, owner of Coleen Ennis Music Studio in Denver, Colorado and a former, vocalist, pianist, and flutist stated that she began teaching music due to the difficulty of making money as a performer. “Unless you’re performing in a major city, a major venue, or even if you don’t have good promotion and publicity, it is very hard to make money as a musician. When you are performing pieces that have been performed plenty of times, you not only have to worry about what makes you different as a performer, but also what reasons should people pay to come and see you.” Said Ennis.

Classical music culture and the performer’s engagement with the audience also plays a large role in the decrease in attendance at concerts, according to Charles Albright, concert pianist and recipient of Gilmore Young Artist Award. Unlike many other popular concerts where the artist interacts with the audience often, and makes the experience seem personable, classical music concerts can be very stiff and quiet, and according to Albright, the performers rarely engages with the audience during the performance, and many concert goers are turned off by the strict dress codes and etiquette that comes along with attending a classical music concert.

With classical music album sales increasing by 5% in the last year but decreasing by 25% in the previous year, according to The Nielsen Company, it seems as if classical music may not be as popular as before; however it is important to acknowledge that although album sales may be down, streams increased 94% in 2014, . Due to these changes in classical music, many trained musicians and composers have taken it upon themselves to engage more people, and younger people, into classical music. Popular concert pianist, Yuja Wang, has shifted the often conservative attire many female performers must wear by wearing short formal dresses, and dresses with high slits and plunging neck lines. Other popular concert pianist Valentina Lisitsa has engaged with a younger audience by posting free videos of her performances on YouTube. Composers such as Yiruma, have added more modern elements to his music in order to make the sound slightly more similar to modern pop music.

So, is interest in classical music dying? There is not a clear yes or no answer, and there are many variables to this discussion, however, there are many ways the classical music industry can reengage a new and younger audience.

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OFFERS AND CURRENT PROMOTIONS

Text Box: International Music Academy GIFT CERTIFICATE for new students only  ONE FREE LESSON Call the IMA Office at 905.489.4620 (Markham) or 905.640.6363 (Stouffville) to schedule your first lesson. Once scheduled, the lesson cannot be rescheduled. Cannot be combined with any other offer. No refunds, no exchanges.

Text Box:   Music is sooooooooo beuatiful!  Register for lessons by September 15, 2018 and receive $50 off New students only. 1 offer per family Cannot be combined with any other offer.

 Text Box: REFER A NEW STUDENT and GET ONE FREE LESSON!  When you refer a new student to the IMA, who registers for lesson, you will get one free lesson for every new student. So, if you refer the IMA to 2 new students, we will give you 2 free lessons; for 3 new students – 3 free lessons etc. Fill in the coupon below and leave it with the IMA Office administrator.   Your name: ______________________________  Name of the new student: __________________  You can print or photocopy this coupon as many times as you need. Cannot be combined with any other offer.

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Dr. Teresa Suen-Campbell
DMA in Harp Performance (Northwestern University)
Studio located in Oakville (Dundas St and Bronte Rd)

  • Now accepting students of all ages; lever or pedal harp
  • Some music background is preferred but not required.
  • Former students won top prizes in various International Harp Competitions.
  • Aural and sight-reading skills training also available.
  • Free consultation on rental/purchase of instrument

Phone: (647) 222-3349
Website: www.teresasuen.com
E-mail: teresasuencampbell@gmail.com