中文 |  Русский |  Français        

News

Newsletter

To print a copy of the current month newsletter and take advantage of exciting offers, coupons and current promotions, click here [PDF].

Year XXIII, No. 12 (December 2019)



WELCOMING OUR NEW STUDENTS

Aaron H., piano
Zoe M., piano
Hanyu Z., piano
Yasmin H., piano/voice
Amy G., piano
Kanimoli R., piano

________________________________________________________________________________

UPCOMING BIRTHDAYS IN DECEMBER

Priyanka R., Daniel Y., Olivia W., Linda L., Renee W., Samir S., Jelena G., Joanne J., Karina M., Shreya R., Emily L., Olivia Z., Gloria Z., Yasmin H., Aaron D., Lucas A., Suyas V., Derek P., Elle Z., Visalie A., Ashwica S., Catherine J., Brigitte B., Brandon C., Augustin D., Diego N., Pracy P., Lucas W., Aaliyah C.W., Atharv A., Aditya A.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

________________________________________________________________________________

IMPORTANT DAYS IN DECEMBER

December 3. Peel Music Festival registration deadline.
December 13-14. RCM theory examinations.
December 14. Flato Markham Theatre
          Kindred Spirit Orchestra. Redemption
December 15. RCM April session applications deadline (piano).
December 20. IMA MID-YEAR PROGRESS REPORTS
December 21-22. IMA WINTER FESTIVAL
December 22-30. Hanukkah. 
December 23-January 3. Winter Break. 
December 25. Christmas Day. School is closed. 
December 26. Boxing Day. IMA is open.

________________________________________________________________________________

NEWS

ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC: January examinations

Many IMA students will be taking their examinations in the second half of January. Under the guidance of their inspiring teachers, students have worked very hard to prepare long and demanding programs. We wish them success!

________________________________________________________________________________

ROYAL CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC IMA MOCK EXAMINATIONS

The IMA is offering to all students who are registered for RCM examinations an opportunity to play their entire program prior to their examination. The mock examinations for the upcoming RCM Winter session is scheduled at the IMA – Stouffville recital hall on Saturday, January 11, 2020.  There are many advantages of playing the examination program in public prior to the examination. Students gain more confidence, become aware of passages that still need more practicing and perform better at their examinations.

________________________________________________________________________________

GET 3 FREE LESSONS WITH THE PURCHASE OF A PIANO

If you are ready to purchase a high quality pre-own piano through one of the IMA commercial partners, 3 of your lessons at the IMA will be free. Call our Office or e-mail Office@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca for more information. Pre-own piano is a great investment that comes at an attractive price, with a free tuning and delivery.

________________________________________________________________________________

GET A $30 CREDIT ON YOUR NEXT MONTH TUITION

We have been very pleased with the continuous success of our students. They have improved a great deal and we share their excitement with their families, friends, neighbors, and schoolmates. We appreciate your interest towards our programs and services. We are always very happy to welcome new students of all ages, levels, and instruments to the iMA. Please tell your friends about your experience with the International Music Academy.

Do you know someone who is thinking of taking music lessons or who has children who may be interested in getting their hands on a musical instrument or singing? Do you know a teenager who needs a high school OAC credit? Do you know an adult who has wanted for a long time to learn how to play a musical instrument but has never had the time or inclination? Please tell them about the IMA.

As an appreciation for your referral, we will give you a $30 credit for each new student who registers at the International Music Academy as a result of your referral. As we value your friends as much as we value you, we will offer to each referred student a $30 credit as well.

________________________________________________________________________________

IMA WINTER MUSIC FESTIVAL
December 21-22, 2019

It has been already two months since the beginning of the school year and we have already had many opportunities to celebrate our student’s success. Now we look forward to preparing well for the Royal Conservatory of Music examinations in January and for the prestigious Kiwanis Music Festival of the GTA in February. In the meantime, the Holiday Season is fast approaching and we will celebrate it with the traditional iMA Winter Music Festival that will take place on Saturday and Sunday, December 21-22, 2019.

The festival will consist of ten separate one-hour concerts (on Saturday – any instrument; on Sunday – only piano and guitar). Book your calendars for this exciting event – together with the iMA Summer Music Festival, it has always been one of the most significant moments for many of our students. The iMA Faculty, staff, and I, we are looking forward to encourage, support, and rejoice our students’ performances.

The iMA Winter Music Festival will take place at the recital hall of the International Music Academy in Stouffville located at 50 Innovator Avenue in Stouffville ON L4A 0Y2. The hall has an excellent grand piano, large screen connected to an HD camera that will allow you to see the finest details of each performance. The Stouffville location is only 10-15 minute drive from the Markham location. A free parking is available in front of the school as well. Detailed information about the Festival will be sent by the beginning of December. Students who have their lessons on Saturday will perform on Sunday and vice versa.

________________________________________________________________________________

FOLLOW US ON

Stay in touch and follow the IMA latest news on Facebook. Visit Facebook and become a friend of the International Music Academy.

________________________________________________________________________________

PERSONALIZED IMA GIFT CARD

The IMA offers personalized Gift Cards that could be used as thoughtful birthday, holiday, bar/bat Mitzvah, graduation gift or for any other occasions as well as to encourage someone to start learning a musical instrument or singing. The card can be used for any products or services.

The gift card is available for any amount. As cards are personalized with the name of the person who will receive it as well as with the name of the person who purchase it, requests have to be made 1 day in advance. Cards can be ordered in person, by phone at 905.489.4620 or by e-mail at info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca. At the time the card is ordered, a non-refundable $5 deposit is required. The full value of the card is paid upon pick-up (and the deposit is credited towards the purchase price). Payments can be made by any major credit card, cheque or cash as well as through the accounts of the IMA Clients.

________________________________________________________________________________

UPCOMING CONCERT AT FLATO MARKHAM THEATRE

______________________________________________________________

COMPOSERS’ ANNIVERSARIES IN DECEMBER

2/12/1990 American composer Copland died

4/12/1976 British composer Britten died

5/12/1791 Austrian composer Mozart died 

7/12/1863 Italian composer Mascagni was born

8/12/1865 Finish composer Sibelius was born

8/12/1890 Czech composer Martinu was born

10/12/1822 Belgian composer César Franck was born

10/12/1908 French composer Messiaen was born

11/12/1803 French composer Berlioz was born

16/12/1770 German composer Beethoven was born 

16/12/1921 French composer Saint-Saëns died

22/12/1858 Italian composer Puccini was born

25/12/1871 Russia composer Scriabin was born

28/12/1937 French composer Ravel died

Where you born or do you know someone who was born on the same day as these famous composers? Drop us e-mail at info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca to let us know.

________________________________________________________________________________

FEATURED TEACHER OF THE MONTH

Vladimir Dounin, M.Mus., B.A.

Piano and Voice, Music Theory

Vladimir Dounin was born in Russia in the family of a military doctor and a kindergarten teacher. When he was a student at Kazan Music College, there was no music teacher in his mom's kindergarten, so Vladimir was invited to teach young children to sing and dance, when he himself was only 14 years old. A year later, he was invited to teach at the music school, and another year later he began working in the opera house as a vocal coach and accompanist. At 17, Vladimir entered the Moscow Conservatory and graduated with honors. After graduation, he worked as a soloist in the philharmonic society in the city of Sochi, and then was an assistant professor to Prof. V. Nielsen at the St. Petersburg Conservatory (post graduate school, Ph.D. in music). In 1970 he was one of the winners of the All-USSR competition. In the following years, Vladimir worked as a concert pianist, opera chorus master and music teacher in Russia, South Africa, and then in Canada. He worked with internationally-renowned concert performers and Opera singers of Russia, Europe and America. Vladimir wrote many articles on"pianostreet.com, pianoworld.com and recorded many videos on "You Tube" related to piano pedagogy.

Mr. Dounin was happy to answer a few questions for our Parents and Students:

1. What do you like most about teaching? Teaching reminds me profession of ophthalmologist. My "patient" (student) looks at the most beautiful pictures of the world but cannot see and appreciate their beauty due to his/her "blurry vision" (misunderstanding). The student usually even cannot describe: what exactly is in front of his/her eyes. And after "treatment" my student is already amazed with the beauty of music and full of pride and happiness thanks to musical achievements. I have the same feeling as well, if our work was successful. Music pays back generously with joy and happiness if we are serious and honest with her.

2. How do you inspire students to practice more? It is difficult to inspire someone to play ugly, unpleasant music. I do not think that someone can be inspired to eat a food with disgusting taste. On other hand, we do not need to inspire kids and even adult to eat ice-cream. And music is just a kind of food. Only the difference is that this "food" is not for mouth but for our ears. My way to inspire my students is playing beautiful, enjoyable music right away, starting from the very first lesson. Any scale, triad, even a single note can sound in a magic way and fascinate us, if we do it in a right way but not "upside down". I always show my students both ways of performing: in a right way and with (their) mistake, and then ask the students: which way do they prefer to play? The next step is to correct mistake and enjoy music without it.

3. What roles does performance play in student’s development? Music students are lucky to be able to read and understand notes, when the majority of people around us cannot do so. It is like we can read interesting stories, and people around us are illiterate and never will hear and know these stories without us. It would be unfair, if we do not share our ability to enjoy and understand music with everyone, who wants and loves music.  It is beneficial for each performer as well: we understand and feel our "musical stories" much better and deeper, when we play our songs for audience. Each performer knows that feelings from public performance and from playing just for yourself are absolutely different. And each new performance opens, discovers something new in every song played publicly. Even if this particular song was played hundreds of times already in the past.  

4. Who are your favourite composers? The best of the best, of course - I am not unusual: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Glinka, Rachmaninov. However, I was lucky many times to find a lot of nice pieces composed by not so popular and even unknown composers.

5. What was the last piece of music (sheet music or a recording) you purchased for yourself? A wonderful book "The joy of children's favourites" by Denes Agay.  Almost 100 good songs in good, professional arrangement. All the rest I have already for many years and can get ANY classical piece from Russian Note Archive momentarily (by Internet).   

Vladimir Dounin was born in Russia in the family of a military doctor and a kindergarten teacher. When he was a student at Kazan Music College, there was no music teacher in his mom's kindergarten, so Vladimir was invited to teach young children to sing and dance, when he himself was only 14 years old. A year later, he was invited to teach at the music school, and another year later he began working in the opera house as a vocal coach and accompanist. At 17, Vladimir entered the Moscow Conservatory and graduated with honors. After graduation, he worked as a soloist in the philharmonic society in the city of Sochi, and then was an assistant professor to Prof. V. Nielsen at the St. Petersburg Conservatory (post graduate school, Ph.D. in music). In 1970 he was one of the winners of the All-USSR competition. In the following years, Vladimir worked as a concert pianist, opera chorus master and music teacher in Russia, South Africa, and then in Canada. He worked with internationally-renowned concert performers and Opera singers of Russia, Europe and America. Vladimir wrote many articles on"pianostreet.com, pianoworld.com and recorded many videos on "You Tube" related to piano pedagogy.

Mr. Dounin was happy to answer a few questions for our Parents and Students:

1. What do you like most about teaching? Teaching reminds me profession of ophthalmologist. My "patient" (student) looks at the most beautiful pictures of the world but cannot see and appreciate their beauty due to his/her "blurry vision" (misunderstanding). The student usually even cannot describe: what exactly is in front of his/her eyes. And after "treatment" my student is already amazed with the beauty of music and full of pride and happiness thanks to musical achievements. I have the same feeling as well, if our work was successful. Music pays back generously with joy and happiness if we are serious and honest with her.

2. How do you inspire students to practice more? It is difficult to inspire someone to play ugly, unpleasant music. I do not think that someone can be inspired to eat a food with disgusting taste. On other hand, we do not need to inspire kids and even adult to eat ice-cream. And music is just a kind of food. Only the difference is that this "food" is not for mouth but for our ears. My way to inspire my students is playing beautiful, enjoyable music right away, starting from the very first lesson. Any scale, triad, even a single note can sound in a magic way and fascinate us, if we do it in a right way but not "upside down". I always show my students both ways of performing: in a right way and with (their) mistake, and then ask the students: which way do they prefer to play? The next step is to correct mistake and enjoy music without it.

3. What roles does performance play in student’s development? Music students are lucky to be able to read and understand notes, when the majority of people around us cannot do so. It is like we can read interesting stories, and people around us are illiterate and never will hear and know these stories without us. It would be unfair, if we do not share our ability to enjoy and understand music with everyone, who wants and loves music.  It is beneficial for each performer as well: we understand and feel our "musical stories" much better and deeper, when we play our songs for audience. Each performer knows that feelings from public performance and from playing just for yourself are absolutely different. And each new performance opens, discovers something new in every song played publicly. Even if this particular song was played hundreds of times already in the past.  

4. Who are your favourite composers? The best of the best, of course - I am not unusual: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Glinka, Rachmaninov. However, I was lucky many times to find a lot of nice pieces composed by not so popular and even unknown composers.

5. What was the last piece of music (sheet music or a recording) you purchased for yourself? A wonderful book "The joy of children's favourites" by Denes Agay.  Almost 100 good songs in good, professional arrangement. All the rest I have already for many years and can get ANY classical piece from Russian Note Archive momentarily (by Internet).   

________________________________________________________________________________

FEATURED STUDENT OF THE MONTH

Esther Fang

 

What instrument do you play? –  I play the piano.

How long have you taken lessons? – It has been about 2 years since I have taken the lessons for piano.

Who are your favourite musical artists? – Ultimately Beethoven!

What are your other hobbies, besides music? – I enjoy singing… as a hobby J

Favourite food? – Anything with potatoes.

What is the coolest thing you’ve learnt in your lessons in the past three months? –  In the past three months, I have learned how to express emotions and character while playing the piano, which is pretty cool!

Do you have any performance coming up? – No, I don’t but may be in future.

E-mail to info@InternationalMusicAcademy.ca a photo of yourself (or your child) together with the answers of the questions above. The deadline for submissions is the 15th of every month. We will feature you in one of the next issues of the newsletter.

________________________________________________________________________________

FEATURED ARTICLE

Music engagement and achievement predicts higher grades in math, science and English

By Scott Emerson   |   August 1, 2019

What does maturing mean after elementary school? Here’s one thing it shouldn’t mean: dropping music at school. My colleagues and I at the University of British Columbia studied over 110,000 public school students. We learned that students involved in extended music engagement (between grades 8 - 12) do one full year better academically than non-music peers, particularly when engaged in instrumental music sustained over years of schooling. Also, music achievement predicts academic achievement in math, science and English. Music matters for its own sake, but also because, as our study shows, music engagement sustained from childhood into adolescence – particularly instrumental music that begins in elementary school – is significantly related to better high school achievement.

Study: Rich data

Thanks to rich educational and socio-economic data capturing the full population of B.C. public school students for several cohorts, we had an unprecedented opportunity to examine how student participation in music and music achievement predicted and related to provincial examination scores in high school English, math and science subjects. We looked at scores from provincial testing from Grade 10 math, science and English as well as Grade 12 English in relationship to students’ participation in music. In our study, we counted both the number of high school courses taken, as well as student high school involvement and grades in graduation program music courses (concert band, jazz band, orchestra, piano and choir) taken across public high school years (Grades 8-12). Based on previous research we inferred that music involvement that continued up to Grade 12 would be associated with (and predict) higher high school grades in mathematics, science and English. We expected instrumental music would have a more pronounced positive impact than vocal music.

We found that this is true, even when we take into account the following four factors: children’s prior elementary school educational achievement in numeracy and literacy, as captured by the B.C. Foundation Skills Assessment Grade 7 examination; gender; socioeconomic background (as gauged by the student’s home neighbourhood); linguistic diversity, captured by language spoken in the home.
We used a statistical regression model and adjusted our analyses to control for those four factors. We did this to demonstrate that these factors were not key determinants in musical or academic achievement and to address the problem of what researchers call confounding — unaccounted-for factors that might lead to incorrect findings.
While we are not yet able to infer causality — that music causes students to be smarter or improve their grades — we were able to identify a predictive relationship between music achievement and academic achievement, and demonstrate that more music engagement can be better for overall learning.

Sustained engagement

A handful of experiments have found that students randomly assigned to music training outperform those assigned to non-music groups.
But music is an inherently complex phenomenon — there are many ways to make and engage with music. Many other studies have examined music participation but they didn’t take into account different types of music making such as instrumental music, vocal music, or other forms and amounts of engagement.
There are many ways to make music. 

Also, several earlier studies have been based on small, unrepresentative samples or considered only brief exposure to music training — whereas a central claim substantiated by our study underscores the academic achievement benefits from sustained engagement in music training over several years.

Increased cognitive capacity

Students in the present study who were highly engaged in instrumental music were, on average, over one year ahead in their math, English and science skills, compared to those peers not engaged in school music.

We say one year ahead because the math, science and English grades that music-engaged students obtained in Grade 10 could place them a full year ahead in their curricular studies. In practical terms, the effect sizes we measured when comparing adolescents in the very highly engaged instrumental music group with the no music group (even after adjustment) were of a magnitude similar to or greater than the average annual gains in reading, science and math that are seen during the high school years in the U.S. context

We attribute these strong associations between music engagement and academic achievement to a combination of increased cognitive capacity. In the brain, instrumental music changes the structure and function of the Heschl’s gyrus (HG) and the specific area which contains it, the auditory cortex (AC).

Students learn to ‘think music’ as their musical learning deepens. 

To make music in upper secondary grade levels, students need to go beyond simple button pushing and the mechanical playing of instruments. Students need to “think music” through a process known as audiation. Audiation is the ability to compare what was heard in the immediate past in music listening with the present, and to connect what was heard with our expectations of what might come next. Music audiation ability is significantly correlated to the structure and function of the Heschl’s gyrus in the auditory cortex.

We do not yet fully understand the mechanisms of how music learning transfers to other developmental areas, but our work and numerous studies suggest that extended, engagement with music learning (particularly instrumental music) enhances cognitive mechanisms.
It is also likely that prolonged and more music engagement results in higher motivation and self-efficacy, executive functions and a positive impact on emotional development and self esteem.
The patterns of our findings suggest that music participation – especially in instrumental music, and multiple years of engagement over time – confers cognitive benefits in the form of tangible differences in many aspects of academic learning.

Significant associations


When focusing solely on learners who took instrumental music, additional important and theoretically plausible findings are revealed — namely that there is a “dose-response” type relationship. This means that higher levels of engagement (more classes) in music are related to incrementally higher exam scores. We also see significant, predictive relationships between higher grades in instrumental music courses and higher exam scores.

Music may not make you smarter, but we now know that music engagement sustained from childhood into adolescence — and more of it, especially instrumental music — may lead to doing better in high school.

An emphasis on numeracy and literacy at the cost of other areas of learning, particularly music, should not be acceptable in our public schools.

Let the band play on!

________________________________________________________________________________

OFFERS AND CURRENT PROMOTIONS

 Text Box: REFER A NEW STUDENT and GET ONE FREE LESSON!  When you refer a new student to the IMA, who registers for lesson, you will get one free lesson for every new student. So, if you refer the IMA to 2 new students, we will give you 2 free lessons; for 3 new students – 3 free lessons etc. Fill in the coupon below and leave it with the IMA Office administrator.   Your name: ______________________________  Name of the new student: __________________  You can print or photocopy this coupon as many times as you need. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Text Box: International Music Academy GIFT CERTIFICATE for new students only  ONE FREE LESSON Call the IMA Office at 905.489.4620 (Markham) or 905.640.6363 (Stouffville) to schedule your first lesson. Once scheduled, the lesson cannot be rescheduled. Cannot be combined with any other offer. No refunds, no exchanges.

Call us in Markham at 905.489.4620 or in Stouffville at 905.640.6363 to start your musical journey today!

Follow us on